Mainz & Surroundings

Mainz & Surroundings

Thanks to its central location, Mainz is not only an attractive conference venue, but also an in-demand business hub for industry, trade and commerce with forward-looking career opportunities and diverse recreational opportunities. And let’s not forget that Mainz is also a good starting point to discover the cultural landscapes of Rhine-Hesse and Middle Rhine.

Altstadt_2
Cathedral Square

Historical buildings and traditional locations with impressive monuments – Mainz has this and much more to offer. If you get near enough and look closely enough, you will learn quite a lot about our 2,000-year-old city. The Roman temple, the royal palace, the Cathedral and Marc Chagall‘s blue stained-glass window await you! Mainz has been many things to many people: the Roman Castrum Moguntiacum, the Jewish Magenza, the residence and capital of the Prince Electors, an archbishopric, a university town and a fortress town of the German Nation´s Holy Roman Empire as well as the Mainz Republic. These are all epochs of “Golden Mainz” as the city has been known since its heyday in the Middle Ages.

St. Martin´s Cathedral

„This cathedral above the Rhine Valley with all of its might and glory would have remained in my memory even if I had never seen it again“, wrote author Anna Seghers. This tremendous cathedral is a key feature of the cityscape even today–over a thousand years after its construction.

St. Martin´s Cathedral
St. Martin´s Cathedral

The Old Town

Attractive squares, beautifully-restored half-timbered houses and magnificent Baroque churches give the Old Town its charming character. Inside fine Baroque houses with Rococo facades you will find elegant boutiques, cafés and wine taverns.

The Old Town
The Old Town

Gutenberg Museum

Today you can experience four thousand years of writing history from around the world in the Gutenberg Museum. Johannes Gutenberg of Mainz played one of the key roles in the process when he invented printing with moveable type and the movable type printing press.

Gutenberg Museum
Gutenberg Museum

Magenza – Jewish Mainz

Mainz is a leading center for the Jewish faith in Germany. It is one of the three German cities known collectively as SchUM and is among the oldest Jewish communities in central Europe. A thousand eventful years of Jewish history have left behind cultural and architectural legacies in ‘Magenza’: the old Jewish Judensand cemetery, for example, is one of the oldest burial sites in Europe. The new synagogue, built in 2010 on the site where the main synagogue once stood, provides an architectural contrast to this.

The new synagogue
The new synagogue

Kunsthalle art gallery

The Kunsthalle art gallery at Mainz’s former customs port is a contemporary art venue that mounted its first exhibition in 2008. Positions refelcting the modern art scene are presented in installations, solo exhibitions and group exhibitions on specific themes.

Kunsthalle art gallery
Kunsthalle art gallery

Mainz Wine Market

Embedded in Germany’s biggest wine-growing area, Rhine-Hesse, Mainz is Germany’s wine capital. Here you can savor everything about wine. Mainz Wine Market traditionally takes place from Thursday to Sunday on the last August and the first weekend in September. The unique ambience of the city park with its wine stalls and the Rose Garden with artists market and champagne are the hard center of the classic wine festival. As a member of the Great Wine Capital composite – do not miss wines from the best international wine regions that can be tasted there.

Weinmarkt
Mainz Wine Market

A Bundesliga-match

A team from Mainz has long been an integral part of the German football Bundesliga. The team of FSV Mainz 05 directs its home games in the Coface Arena, the games are held on Fridays, Saturdays or Sundays. Tickets can be ordered here.

St. Stephan – Chagall Window

A total of 200,000 visitors a year prove that St. Stephan is a major attraction! Tourists from around the world make the hike up the Stephansberg to see Marc Chagall’s sparkling blue windows.

Mogontiacum – The Mainz of Roman Times

Mogontiacum, the Mainz of Roman times, was an important place in antiquity. The city’s roots were in the Castrum, the camp of the Roman Legion, a strategic site on the hill across from where the Main flows into the Rhine. From here, Mainz developed into a military (and later also the civil) centre of the region.

Zitadelle Mainz

The Mainz Zitadelle (citadel) is one of the most significant monuments in Mainz. Here you get a lot of information about the heritage building and its history. In addition they offer different, exciting guided tours, also in the underground. The citadel as well is a popular location for various events: open air theatre, concerts, a wine tour, the citadel-festival or a christmas market.

text and photos: www.touristik-mainz.de

Surroundings

Not only Mainz as a city, but also the close surroundings offer a number of popular excursion destinations worth seeing. On this page we describe a small choice of destinations worth visiting. The German National Tourist Board’s website offers additional information on tourist destinations: www.germany.travel.

The Rhine Valley

Only a few kilometers behind Mainz begins the middle Rhine valley. The unique and centuries old cultural landscape between Bingen and Koblenz has been appointed world cultural heritage by UNESCO in 2002. This is why when you stay in Mainz, you should not miss the chance to visit and enjoy the impressive river landscape with its picturesque, small villages, the steep vineyards and the numerous castles. The best thing is to take one of the excursion ships which depart from and return to Mainz on a regular schedule. For longer trips you can also return to Mainz by railway. Motivated visitors with sporty ambitions may want to hike on the Rhine path which is well signposted and which offers great views along the river. Particularly worth visiting are the towns Ruedesheim, Bacharach, St. Goar and St. Goarshausen. Further information on the middle Rhine valley: www.romantischer-rhein.de

Rhine Valley
Rhine Valley

Eberbach Monastery

The Eberbach Monastery situated on the right side of the Rhine had been the spiritual and scientific center of the region for a long period. It belongs to the oldest Cistercian monasteries in Germany and had been founded by bishops in Mainz in the 12th century. During the 13th and 14th century, the monastery had its heyday primarily due to generous trade privileges and the huge number of owned vineyards. When the monastery was dissolved at the end of the 18th century, the buildings stood empty and later they were used as a sanatorium. Nowadays, the huge monastery grounds with their large wine cellars can be visited and they are well worth a visit! The monastery also served as a setting for Umberto Ecco’s novel “the Name of the Rose” which had been shot here with Sean Connery in the title role in 1986. Please follow this link for further information on the Eberbach Monastery: kloster-eberbach.de.

Eberbach Monastery
Eberbach Monastery

Wiesbaden

Wiesbaden is the Hessian State Capital; Mainz is just located on the other side of the Rhine. Contrary to Mainz, Wiesbaden’s atmosphere is less student-oriented but has a more glamorous and sophisticated scene. Wiesbaden’s economic upturn is closely related to the hot springs which emerge from the earth at the foot of the Taunus Mountains. During the 18th and 19th century, the town became the center of health-related tourism because baths and medical applications were offered. Wiesbaden’s visitors go into raptures when they look at the historical substance of the city. Architecturally, more than perhaps any other German city, Wiesbaden represents historicism. You will have to visit the gardens and the Wiesbaden Kurhaus (Casino) or take a trip up the Neroberg with the nostalgic rack railway. Further information on Wiesbaden: www.wiesbaden.de

Kurhaus Wiesbaden
Kurhaus Wiesbaden

Frankfurt

Frankfurt/Main has the third largest airport in Europe and for many tourists it is a gateway to Germany. At first glance, you’ll recognize the most impressive skyline which characterizes Frankfurt as international finance and trade fair city. But Frankfurt is much more than this: the city in the heart of Germany has many facets and offers a wide variety of contrasts. Close to the skyscrapers, there are many old taverns offering the well-known “ebbelwoi” (= cider). Furthermore, you always find a lot of historical monuments and attractions in this busy city. In Frankfurt, there is the Kaiserdom and the Paulskirche, which is the cradle of German democracy. Further information on Frankfurt: www.frankfurt-tourismus.de

Frankfurt Skyline
Frankfurt Skyline

Heidelberg

Heidelberg has more than one million overnight guests per year and is one of Germany’s big tourist highlights. Situated on the river Neckar, Heidelberg is regarded as the embodiment of German romanticism and is on top of the wish list of many city travelers. Within a manageable space, Heidelberg offers a variety of extremely different sights. The majestic Heidelberg Castle located high above the old town, is literally Heidelberg’s crown! The fact that for more than 300 years, it is rather a ruin does not destroy its charm. Inseparably linked to the history of the town is also the more than 600 years old University of Heidelberg; it is Germany’s oldest university. Heidelberg can be reached by train from Mainz in less than one hour. Further information on Heidelberg: www.heidelberg-marketing.com

Heidelberg
Heidelberg